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Sean Monterrosa loved to read books.He also loved to restore old cars and had just finished a job training program in carpentry. He was the middle brother with siblings who adored him. He was an athlete. He worked with Latinx youth in his community and strived to make a positive impact on the world. 

 

His last text was to his sister, asking her to sign a petition for George Floyd.

 

On June 2, Sean was shot and killed by police while sitting on his knees with his hands raised up in the air. Officer Jarrett Tonn of the Vallejo Police Department in Northern California fired through the window of his unmarked police car. In what was essentially a drive-by, Tonn shot an unarmed, non-violent, totally compliant Sean five times. 

 

Tonn has a troubling history of police violence, including three shootings since 2015. To justify his shooting of Sean, Tonn used an age-old excuse law enforcement officers use to avoid being held accountable for the murders they commit on a daily basis. 

 

He claimed he thought Sean had a gun. 

 

While protests against police brutality and white supremacy continue to take place across the world, there is a sharp spotlight on corrupt police departments and the local elected officials who have the power to hold them responsible. 

 

The Vallejo PD has yet to release body camera footage connected to Sean’s shooting and has failed to confirm details about it. Mounting public pressure, both online and at protests where Sean was killed, will stop Vallejo PD from remaining silent much longer. 

 

It is easy to get lost in the sea of names and faces of victims of police brutality. So much violence occurs every single day, multiple times a day, in the worst forms imaginable. It is easy to lose track of the fact that these people are not just cases, murders or deaths. They are lives, lives that were cut short. While much of the focus of the current movement has been on Black men, women, and children specifically, the outpour of support from all nationalities has been astounding. Sean Monterrosa was a young Latino who was fighting hard for Black lives, so the community must show up for him in the same capacity. 

 

Monumental changes are being made every day. In Lousiville, where Breonna Taylor was murdered by police while sleeping in her own bed, the City Council has just passed the strongest law in the country banning no-knock warrants. Cities everywhere are defunding their police departments and using those funds to invest back in their communities. Schools are removing police from their schools and replacing them with trained counselors and social workers. 

 

Change is happening, but not nearly enough to stop the fight of radically reforming America’s grossly corrupt and purposefully racist legal system. There is still so much justice that must be delivered.

Ep. 257 - StandWithSean.com

Feb 05, 2020

Full DESCRIPTION:

We need you to know Sean Monterrosa's name. You might be tired, but we still have to fight when we're faced with such blatant injustice. Sean was unarmed, non-violent, and on his knees with his hands up when Vallejo Police Officer Jarrett Tonn shot him five times through the windshield of his car. Join us as we fight for justice for Sean.

Sean Monterrosa loved to read books.He also loved to restore old cars and had just finished a job training program in carpentry. He was the middle brother with siblings who adored him. He was an athlete. He worked with Latinx youth in his community and strived to make a positive impact on the world. 

 

His last text was to his sister, asking her to sign a petition for George Floyd.

 

On June 2, Sean was shot and killed by police while sitting on his knees with his hands raised up in the air. Officer Jarrett Tonn of the Vallejo Police Department in Northern California fired through the window of his unmarked police car. In what was essentially a drive-by, Tonn shot an unarmed, non-violent, totally compliant Sean five times. 

 

Tonn has a troubling history of police violence, including three shootings since 2015. To justify his shooting of Sean, Tonn used an age-old excuse law enforcement officers use to avoid being held accountable for the murders they commit on a daily basis. 

 

He claimed he thought Sean had a gun. 

 

While protests against police brutality and white supremacy continue to take place across the world, there is a sharp spotlight on corrupt police departments and the local elected officials who have the power to hold them responsible. 

 

The Vallejo PD has yet to release body camera footage connected to Sean’s shooting and has failed to confirm details about it. Mounting public pressure, both online and at protests where Sean was killed, will stop Vallejo PD from remaining silent much longer. 

 

It is easy to get lost in the sea of names and faces of victims of police brutality. So much violence occurs every single day, multiple times a day, in the worst forms imaginable. It is easy to lose track of the fact that these people are not just cases, murders or deaths. They are lives, lives that were cut short. While much of the focus of the current movement has been on Black men, women, and children specifically, the outpour of support from all nationalities has been astounding. Sean Monterrosa was a young Latino who was fighting hard for Black lives, so the community must show up for him in the same capacity. 

 

Monumental changes are being made every day. In Lousiville, where Breonna Taylor was murdered by police while sleeping in her own bed, the City Council has just passed the strongest law in the country banning no-knock warrants. Cities everywhere are defunding their police departments and using those funds to invest back in their communities. Schools are removing police from their schools and replacing them with trained counselors and social workers. 

 

Change is happening, but not nearly enough to stop the fight of radically reforming America’s grossly corrupt and purposefully racist legal system. There is still so much justice that must be delivered.

    1. Go to www.StandWithSean.com and add your name to the petition, which will automatically send an email to the city officials with the power to fire and charge the officer that killed Sean Monterrosa.
    2. Call (707) 209-7176 to speak directly to city officials. Shaun's voice will be on the other end of the line guiding you through it.
Ep. 257 - StandWithSean.com
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