Trump Makes Outrageous Claim Comparing Impeachment to Lynching

President Donald Trump caused outrage once again when he compared the impeachment inquiry against him to a “lynching” in a tweet. The remarks caused outrage on both sides of the aisle, with many noting the remarks were consistent with Trump’s history of racist commentary.

“So some day, if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights,” Trump tweeted on October 22. “All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here — a lynching. But we will WIN!”

African American politicians and other lawmakers quickly denounced the president’s use of the word lynching. He previously referred to the probe as a “witch hunt” and a “fraud,” but this was his first reference to the process as a “lynching.”

“Lynching is a reprehensible stain on this nation’s history, as is this President,” tweeted Senator Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), a candidate in the 2020 Democratic primary. “We’ll never erase the pain and trauma of lynching, and to invoke that torture to whitewash your own corruption is disgraceful.”

Fellow Democratic senator and presidential candidate Cory Booker (D-N.J.) tweeted, “Lynching is an act of terror used to uphold white supremacy. Try again.”

Representative Will Hurd (R-Texas), the only African American Republican in the House, called the president’s comments “crazy,” according to CNN. “It’s a crazy statement. It shouldn’t have been said and it shows a level of insensitivity to a horrific period in our history,” Hurd told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer.

Hurd continued: “It contributes to this notion that Republicans are not understanding of the plight of minorities. So I wouldn’t have done it. I would advise him to stay away from that and again this level of insensitivity to a dark period is not acceptable.”

Meanwile, Senator Tim Scott (R-S.C.), the only African American Republican in the Senate, told reporters he understood Trump’s frustrations but said he would steer clear of “the word lynching.” He added that he would love to see the House vote on the Justice for Victims of Lynching Act, which passed the Senate unanimously in February.

Republican leaders condemned the President’s choice of words, but also criticized the House’s impeachment inquiry. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told reporters, “Given the history in our country, I would not compare this to a lynching. That was an unfortunate choice of words.”

McConnell then argued the process used by House Democrats in the impeachment inquiry was “unfair,” CNN reported.

House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) echoed those sentiments in his own remarks to reporters, saying that he did not “agree with that language.” However, he too went on to criticize the investigation into the president.

“It’s very clear that what the Democrats are doing here does not have due process, is not fair in the process, is not something that this House has done ever in the past,” he said.

Senator Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), one of Trump’s fiercest supporters in the Senate, strongly defended his use of the word lynching. “I think that’s pretty well accurate,” Graham said, according to CNN. “This is a sham. This is a joke. I’m going to let the whole world know that if we were doing this to a Democratic President you would be all over me right now.”

He added, “So yeah this is a lynching, in every sense. This is un-American.”

Lynchings were a common method of extralegal mob justice when racial tensions in the US exploded in the late 1800s. Nearly 5,000 lynching were recording in the country between 1882 and 1968, according to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

The NAACP reported that Black people accounted for 72.7 percent of the 4,743 lynchings that happened in the US during that time period. Of that total, 1,297 white people were also lynched, some for crimes but many were lynched for helping Black people or for being opposed to lynching.

In a statement released on October 23, the NAACP stated that Trump demonstrated “a repugnant show of ignorance” in comparing “a well-deserved impeachment probe into his egregious conduct as commander-in-chief to the painful, bloody, and despicable history of lynching.”

The statement added: “A president that decides to diminish the seriousness of lynching by uttering it as a comparison to his wrongdoings has no regard or respect for African Americans who have suffered tremendously.”


About the Author

Nicole Rojas is a breaking news writer for The North Star. She has published in various publications, including Newsweek, GlobalPost, IHS Jane’s Defence Weekly, and the Long Island Post. Nicole graduated from Boston University in 2012 with a degree in print journalism. She is an avid world traveler who recently explored Asia and Australia. President Donald Trump caused outrage once again when he compared the impeachment inquiry against him to a “lynching” in a tweet. The remarks caused outrage on both sides of the aisle, with many noting the remarks were consistent with Trump’s history of racist commentary.

“So some day, if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights,” Trump tweeted on October 22. “All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here — a lynching. But we will WIN!”

African American politicians and other lawmakers quickly denounced the president’s use of the word lynching. He previously referred to the probe as a “witch hunt” and a “fraud,” but this was his first reference to the process as a “lynching.” “Lynching is a reprehensible stain on this nation’s history, as is this President,” tweeted Senator Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), a candidate in the 2020 Democratic primary. “We’ll never erase the pain and trauma of lynching, and to invoke that torture to whitewash your own corruption is disgraceful.”

Fellow Democratic senator and presidential candidate Cory Booker (D-N.J.) tweeted, “Lynching is an act of terror used to uphold white supremacy. Try again.”

Representative Will Hurd (R-Texas), the only African American Republican in the House, called the president’s comments “crazy,” according to CNN. “It’s a crazy statement. It shouldn’t have been said and it shows a level of insensitivity to a horrific period in our history,” Hurd told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer.

Hurd continued: “It contributes to this notion that Republicans are not understanding of the plight of minorities. So I wouldn’t have done it. I would advise him to stay away from that and again this level of insensitivity to a dark period is not acceptable.” Meanwile, Senator Tim Scott (R-S.C.), the only African American Republican in the Senate, told reporters he understood Trump’s frustrations but said he would steer clear of “the word lynching.” He added that he would love to see the House vote on the Justice for Victims of Lynching Act, which passed the Senate unanimously in February.

Republican leaders condemned the President’s choice of words, but also criticized the House’s impeachment inquiry. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told reporters, “Given the history in our country, I would not compare this to a lynching. That was an unfortunate choice of words.”

McConnell then argued the process used by House Democrats in the impeachment inquiry was “unfair,” CNN reported. House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) echoed those sentiments in his own remarks to reporters, saying that he did not “agree with that language.” However, he too went on to criticize the investigation into the president.

“It’s very clear that what the Democrats are doing here does not have due process, is not fair in the process, is not something that this House has done ever in the past,” he said.

Senator Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), one of Trump’s fiercest supporters in the Senate, strongly defended his use of the word lynching. “I think that’s pretty well accurate,” Graham said, according to CNN. “This is a sham. This is a joke. I’m going to let the whole world know that if we were doing this to a Democratic President you would be all over me right now.”

He added, “So yeah this is a lynching, in every sense. This is un-American.”

Lynchings were a common method of extralegal mob justice when racial tensions in the US exploded in the late 1800s. Nearly 5,000 lynching were recording in the country between 1882 and 1968, according to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). The NAACP reported that Black people accounted for 72.7 percent of the 4,743 lynchings that happened in the US during that time period. Of that total, 1,297 white people were also lynched, some for crimes but many were lynched for helping Black people or for being opposed to lynching.

In a statement released on October 23, the NAACP stated that Trump demonstrated “a repugnant show of ignorance” in comparing “a well-deserved impeachment probe into his egregious conduct as commander-in-chief to the painful, bloody, and despicable history of lynching.”

The statement added: “A president that decides to diminish the seriousness of lynching by uttering it as a comparison to his wrongdoings has no regard or respect for African Americans who have suffered tremendously.”


About the Author

About the Author

Nicole Rojas is a breaking news writer for The North Star. She has published in various publications, including Newsweek, GlobalPost, IHS Jane’s Defence Weekly, and the Long Island Post. Nicole graduated from Boston University in 2012 with a degree in print journalism. She is an avid world traveler who recently explored Asia and Australia.