#InTheseTweets | Twentieth Edition

Donney Rose
Jun 24, 2020 - 2:28

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In These Tweets is a weekly cultural dive into trending topics on Twitter. A collection of snapshot analyses on a variety of moments impacting our world. Sometimes serious, sometimes light, always substantive. We outchea, #InTheseTweets.

Hey Fam,

Before diving into this week’s tweets let’s take a minute to pause and reflect on the fact that we been OUTCHEA IN THESE TWEETS TOGETHER FOR 20 WEEKS! Okay, now that the bottles have popped, let’s see what’s happening in the Twitterverse.

As American industries have entered varying levels of reopening phases, one of the nation’s most prominent institutions are keeping its employees at bay until the start of 2021. The New York Times metro writers Michael Gold and Troy Closson recently co-authored a piece on NYC’s reopening of business offices but were able to continue to craft their story from the comfort of their own homes. The article highlighted the emptiness of subway cars and the sparsely business districts during rush hour. Per the article. the city began easing restrictions this past Monday, ushering in a much larger reopening phase that permits outdoor dining, some in-store shopping, and also allows hair salons, barbershops and real estate firms to restart their work.

With new cases of coronavirus rising in 23 states, it is still risky business for the masses to be flooding office spaces. It will be interesting to watch how the Phase 2 reopening plays out in the Big Apple as the city has begun to see a bit of leveling with regards to new infections.

The journalists of The Times still get to write about the times in their PJs tho, so that’s a win for them and a few hundred less bodies in the streets.

The year 2020 is taking a toll on Black America in a myriad of ways. From a disproportionate number of COVID-19 fatalities to a multitude of high profile police killings of unarmed Black citizens, it seems as if the “clear vision” many of us were hoping to attain this year, has been another teary-eyed flip of the calendar that we find ourselves begging to get beyond.

As devastating as the pandemic has been for businesses, large and small, the Los Angeles Times recently reported on the specifically disastrous impact of the virus on  Black-owned businesses.

This is not a new revelation. As per the report, only 31% of Black-owned businesses received all the funding they applied for in 2018, compared with 49% of white-owned businesses, 39% of Asian-owned firms and 35% of Latino-owned businesses. During the same time frame, 38% of Black-owned small businesses did not receive any of the financings they applied for, compared with 33% of Latino-owned businesses, 24% of Asian-owned businesses and 20% of white-owned businesses.

These numbers are not just moderately imbalanced, they show a sizable discrepancy in loan opportunities for Black-owned businesses that only stood to widen in this period of economic uncertainty. The only silver lining, if you can call it one, is America is engaging in a long-overdue conversation about the systemic inequities faced by Black folks in this country. Some of those dialogues are pointing people in the direction of supporting Black businesses.

Still, there’s a long way to go to level off those inequitable numbers.

I never watched an episode of ‘30 Rock’ but apparently, Tina Fey, its creator, has requested that the show’s “blackface” episodes be pulled from syndication, Variety reported. My real question to Tina, who appears to be an extremely sharp-witted and talented comic, is why the hell did you think it was smart to have multiple “blackface” episodes to begin with? I am low-key baffled as to how so many seemingly intelligent white folks had not realized all this time that maybe it was offensive to display this type of characterization in media. Like, exactly how many writers does it take to put in a writers’ room for somebody to say, “Hey guys, maybe we should not do a third episode using blackface?”

They can remove all the damn credits for all I care, I wasn’t watching it before and damn sure ain’t interested in it now.

The Washington Post Global Opinions editor and 2019 NABJ Journalist of the Year, Karen Attiah, offered a reality check for industries, organizations and everyone who believes that achieving diversity is an end game. Attiah informed her 183,000+ followers that “diversity without empowerment of Black people and other people of color is tokenization” and that “tokenization reinforces white supremacy”. 

It seems like a simple concept, but those of us who identify as people of color are constantly being reminded just how blinding whiteness is to white folks’ worldview. But to any white person out there reading this, let’s be clear: it is not enough to have pinches of Black, Brown, Indigenous or other folks of color in your spaces just to say you have them. What is their function in your place of business or organization? How much decision-making power do they hold? What is the probability of them being able to ascend to the highest position of your entity?

If you cannot answer those questions in a manner that maximizes the humanity, intelligence and capability of the people of color around you, you are actively tokenizing the people of color around you. There are much better uses of those people’s time and talents than filling your quota.

Author Barbara Janik tweeted a sobering message that was liked by over 147,000 people and retweeted by more than 12,000 people, as it displayed the very real ways a person’s political beliefs can impact interpersonal/professional relationships. “I just fired my therapist. I found out she’s 100% a Trump supporter. I just can’t with these people,” Janik tweeted. For me, her decision makes perfect sense.

Since therapy is such an intimate and personal form of care for millions of people, I can totally get the apprehension in seeking counsel from someone who supports the views of someone so toxic. I have said hundreds of times that someone who is a diehard Trump supporter is someone who is beyond the threshold of being a conservative. Trump fundamentally represents something far more harmful than a conservative agenda. To have someone that you confide in be entangled in the warped ideologies of Donald Trump is to subject yourself to receive a compromised logic, no matter how “trained” the therapist purports to be.

There are some services where it may not be as detrimental to utilize a Trump-loving professional, but mental health does not seem to be one of them. Smart move, Barbara.

One Reply to “#InTheseTweets | Twentieth Edition”

  1. Working with co-workers who are Trump supporters is a “I just can’t” situation. And dating someone one who is a Trump supporter is out of the question.

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